F Olena 9-17

Master Class with Elena Pedan

A master class taught by Elena Pedan, soloist with the Moscow Ballet, was held at our BAC studio on October 9, 2017.

Elena is also the Auditions Director for “The Great Russian Nutcracker”, and was here in Charleston conducting the audition for the 2017 production held at our studio in West Ashley the previous Saturday.  A production in which many of our own students will take a part on December 9, 2017 at the North Charleston Performing Arts Center. *

Ms. Pedan was born in Dnipropretrovsk, Ukraine.  Realizing her love of the stage through winning a school beauty contest, she began studying ballet at the age of 9 at the Dnepropetrovsk Academic Opera and Ballet Theater.  After graduating in 2006, she entered the Dnepropetrovsk Theater and Art College where she studied for 4 years.  She later received a Master’s Degree with the International Slavic University at the Faculty of Choreography and Directing while dancing professionally with the dance company associated with the school of her youth.  Elena also has taught at this same studio where she originally began her training and career.  This year marks her first traveling with the Moscow Ballet throughout America in the unique capacity as Soloist and Auditions Director.  Additionally, Ms. Pedan tours internationally as a guest artist with ballet companies in Europe and Asia.

Our students, as well as some visiting students, were thrilled to experience this rare opportunity to benefit from Ms. Pedan’s knowledge and experience.  Ms. Pedan’s class was challenging yet interesting.  This is just one of many master classes we offer throughout the year to students in the area.  We are thankful to Ms. Pedan and wholeheartedly look forward to her coming again!

*For more information or to purchase tickets, please visit their website at http://www.nutcracker.com/your-city/get-tickets/north-charleston

OR

https://www.groupon.com/browse/charleston?lat=32.7766&lng=-79.9309&address=Charleston&query=moscow+ballet&locale=en_US

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What is PBT?

PBT stands for Progressing Ballet Technique.

PBT is an innovative program designed to train dancers in muscle memory to improve technique, flexibility and longevity in dance, while gaining a greater awareness of their muscles and how to use them properly to achieve their goals in ballet.

Its original creator, Marie Walton-Mahon, is formerly of the Les Ballet de Marseilles, and since ending her own career has pursued teaching in her home country of Australia with great success and celebrity.  Seeing the need for an increased understanding of body mechanics and proprioception (awareness of one’s body spatially) in students, and feeling inspired by the immediate feedback of an unstable surface as found in a stability ball, Ms. Walton-Mahon began experimenting with various exercises on her students with demonstrable success.  Finally, in 2004 PBT was born!  She has since grown this technique into a veritable empire, spreading her knowledge through workshops held worldwide and a significant online reach.

Megan Berlint-Nicko is the Owner/Director of PBT U.S.®.  A former professional ballet and jazz dancer, trained in the Ceccechetti method, Ms. Berlint-Nicko began her teaching career at age fifteen.   She has obtained several teaching certificates, shaping her focus on training strong, healthy dancers.  Fascinated by how PBT can improve not only a dancer’s technique but contributes to their safe training and increased longevity, Ms. Berlint-Nicko began studying this method on her own.  Seeing its impact on her own body and accessing muscles she had not fully utilized even during her own dance career, she recognized the need to train young dancers from an early age to prevent injury.  After months of personal study, she traveled to Australia to train directly with Marie Walton-Mahon and was then granted the rights to brand PBT in the U.S.  She currently holds teacher workshops all over the U.S. and Canada.

Ms. Berlint-Nicko visited Charleston last month and trained two of our instructors, as well as our studio owner in this revolutionary method.  The workshop was held in our BAC studio and was one and half days of intense, yet fun, work!  Everyone who participated agrees that they came out with a greater understanding how to train students to achieve their best in ballet.

Ballet Academy of Charleston is the first and only studio in Charleston to receive this certification and licensure.  In addition to offering full PBT classes, we will soon include some of the exercises in our regular ballet classes in order to expose our students to the benefits of this incredible technique.  Furthermore, we hope to share this method with all students in the area who chose to take this class with us!

For more information:

http://www.pbtus.com/about

https://pbt.dance

F Olena 9-17

Interview with Ms. Jessica on Bolshoi Teacher Certification

Ms. Jessica Lighthart just obtained her second certification with the Bolshoi Ballet Academy. Recently, we conducted a Q&A with her to learn more about her experience.

Q: What made you choose to obtain the Bolshoi certificate?

A: “ I chose the Bolshoi Ballet Academy (BBA) Teacher Certification Program (TCP) because our focus at Ballet Academy of Charleston is on the Russian style. The BBA curriculum is known around the world for their focus on strength, musicality, and classical technique. There is something so pure and beautiful about it. It was a no brainer for me – I wanted to learn more!”

Q: What is the difference between the Vaganova and Bolshoi techniques styles?

A: “The Vaganova Method is the foundation for the BBA curriculum. BBA grew and expanded from it, therefore becoming it’s own style focusing on individual progress.”

Q: Where did you go for the training and how long did it take?

A: “The training takes place in NYC, and is a very intensive, week-long program.”

Q: How is the curriculum (BBA teacher’s cert) taught?

A: “We spend half of the day in the classroom (taking LOTS of notes!), and the other half in the studio.”

Q: How is it altered (if at all) for American pupils?

A: “The curriculum we learn is the same which is taught at the Bolshoi Academy in Russia. BBA teachers from Moscow teach the entire program. It is all in Russian, but we have a translator.”

Q: You also obtained a level A Cert a couple years ago. How does the B compare?

A: “Last year, I completed the Level A certification, which is for years 1-3 at the BBA. This summer I completed Level B, which is years 4 and 5. Next year, I am hoping to complete my Level C certification, which is years 6-8. It obviously gets harder each year as the levels become more advanced.”

Q: How have you implemented what you learned in your teaching and with what effect on your students?

A: “I have been applying my new knowledge in every class that I teach. It has really made me focus more on the process of how and why we teach something. I can really tell a difference with my students!”

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Does practice always make perfect?

We’re all familiar with the adage, “Practice makes perfect.”  But does it always?  Consider this quote by American scholar, Hamza Yusuf:  “Practice makes permanent, not perfect.  If you practice the wrong thing, you make the wrong act permanent.”  In other words, practice instills within us a permanent habit, for good or for bad.  It’s how we practice which largely affects how successful we will be, not merely the number of hours or repetitions spent on a given task.

The point is not that practice is unimportant, but that only when done correctly, can it lead to the results we desire. If you are attempting to drive a car forward while the gear shift is set in reverse and hit the gas 100 times, will the car eventually move forward?  The answer is obvious.  The point being, if you practice something incorrectly, you will learn it and perform it…You guessed it…incorrectly!  

So, how does one make sure they are practicing correctly?  The online education platform, TED-Ed states, “Effective practice is consistent, intensely focused and targets content or weaknesses that lie at the edge of one’s current abilities.”  They offer the following suggestions:

  1. Focus on the task at hand and minimize distractions.  Avoid daydreaming or talking in class and listen to your teacher, even when the instruction seems unrelated to you.
  2. Start out slowly.  Coordination is built with repetitions. If you gradually increase the speed of quality repetitions, you have a better chance of doing them correctly.  When learning a new exercise, practice it carefully and slowly under the watchful eye of your teacher, being sure to do it correctly before you increase your speed!  This is especially crucial in dance, since performing certain movements improperly can result in injury.
  3. Be balanced.  Frequent repetitions with allotted breaks are common practice habits of elite performers.  Many top athletes, musicians and dancers spend 50-60 hours per week on activities related to their craft.  Many divide their time into multiple daily practice sessions of limited duration.  Short practice sessions daily in between your weekly lessons can be immensely beneficial and will train your brain and body to treat the movement as second nature.
  4. Practice in your brain in vivid detail.  A number of studies suggest that once a physical motion has been established, it can be reinforced just by imagining it.  So, even when you can’t practice the steps with your body, you can “practice” them in your head!

In addition, a student may come to feel that their regular classes and at-home practice sessions are not quite enough to help them achieve the increased “edge” they are looking for.  Or they may be dealing with a discipline or movement which is particularly challenging for them.  If this is the case, a student should first approach their teacher and politely request specific feedback or exercises they can do on their own.  They may also consider speaking to their parents and teacher about additional classes and private lessons as a supplement to their training.  

Lastly, don’t expect perfection!  Sure, you want to try your best, but beating yourself up over a perceived flaw is neither productive or healthy.  

The conclusion?  Listen to your teacher, accept the correction and implement it to the best of your ability.  Practice as “perfectly” as you can, and the result will be a beautiful, healthy dancer, permanently.

 

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Master Class with Michelle Ramos

On March 31, advanced students from the Greater Charleston Area were treated to a fantastic master class with Michelle Ramos!  The class was challenging , both physically and mentally and the students thoroughly enjoyed Ms. Ramos’ enthusiasm in teaching. Click here for more information about Michelle Ramos.

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Rainbow Fish Tickets go on Sale March 1st!

Are you as excited as we are? Rehearsals are in progress and we start counting the days to the big show. 

We have 39 students participating in this year’s performance. Besides the Rainbow Fish and the Little Blue Fish, the cast includes several schools of fish, the Lionfish, Starfish, Octopus, Seahorse, and Crabs and Seagrass.

Here’s our Rainbow Fish rehearsing:

 
Tickets to the show will go on sale on March 1st at 10am.

Stay tuned for a direct link to tickets and more rehearsal videos.